Quick question....

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Quick question....

Post by Multiracer on 10/22/2017, 8:12 pm

First topic message reminder :

Does anyone use the urethane bumpers behind their guide rods on 45's.
I just got an awesome Colt ball gun and it had and old hard one in there along with a two piece guide rod that had a spring loaded plunger ordeal in the center of it ?
Disassembled,cleaned and ready for a test fire this coming week.
Ron

Multiracer

Posts : 248
Join date : 2017-03-15
Location : North Ohio

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Re: Quick question....

Post by Gary Wells on 10/26/2017, 1:39 pm

Full Length Guide Rods (FLGR’s)
 
 
 
 
It has been proven that FLGRs in general neither help nor hurt accuracy.

It is impossible for a .45 auto recoil spring to bind & / or kink inside the gun with a GI type guide rod unless it was kinked before installation.

2 piece FLGRs are considered inferior to 1 pc guide rods by many as they can come apart and / or loose, and require a allen wrench for assembly and disassembly.

.45 autos having 2 piece FLGRs in most cases are easier to assemble and disassemble than those that do not have a FLGR. Depends mostly on the experience of the shooter in which system he has the most time with assembly &/or disassembly. Heavier spring rates are more difficult.

FLGRs add a little weight to the muzzle end of the gun, thus reducing recoil tip-up and aiding in the back on target time.

FLGRs can and probably will smooth out the cycling a tad.

Some FLGRs are available in tungsten, increasing the weight at the muzzle a tad more.

Most of the gamers and competition shooters use them in one form or another.

They do remove the "twang" sound when cycling your .45 auto by hand if it does so. Some .45 autos have that "Twang" and some don't. That is the recoil spring rubbing against the frame recoil spring tunnel generally.

I neither recommend nor not recommend the use FLGRs. Regardless of what others tell you it is strictly a matter of personal preference.

FLGRs do have quite a few haters, that's for sure.

FWIW, I use FLGRs in all 6 of my 1911 platform .45 autos.

Gary Wells

Posts : 173
Join date : 2015-09-07

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Re: Quick question....

Post by Gary Wells on 10/26/2017, 7:28 pm

Handgun Shock-buff Recommendations: 06-10-2012
 
Ed Brown: Does not recommend the use of Shok-buffs in any of their guns and there is not enough room to accept a standard thick Shok-buff and sling-shot.
Les Baer: Shipped with a Shok-buff in at least their 5” Premier II guns but it is rumored that all or most will not sling-shot with the Shok-buff in place.
Wilson Combat: Shipped with a Wilson Combat Shok-buff in their 5” guns only.
A Shok-buff does limit the length that the slide travels backward.
Not all guns have enough room to use a Shok-buff and still slingshot.
Examples: Ed Browns, on at least the Executive Target & Les Baer, on at least the Premier II do not have enough room for a standard (.100-.105 thick) Shok-buff and still slingshot.
Guns that do not have enough room for a Shok-buff can exhibit 2 negative characteristics that could prove fatal in a life or death scenario.
1) Slide may not go back far enough to slingshot, that is allow the slide to be pulled back just enough to allow the slide to go forward to battery.
2) Shok-buffs may limit rearward travel enough to not allow the slide to stay open on last round fired.
Other than those limitations, Shok-buffs are a matter of personal preference & / opinion.
If you are not familiar with a Shok-buff's limitations and use one, eventually it will screw you up, and not always at a convenient time.
Dawson Precision markets a .100 thick aluminum Shok-buff (# 032-001 DP 1911 HiCap Aluma Buff Shock Buffs) that is used by a lot of the gamers & competition shooters. Ones using it seem to be quite satisfied with it. These will not work in Les Baer or Ed Brown handguns without modification due to their thickness.
Joe Cominolli of Cominolli Custom makes a shock absorber type of device that requires 2 different thicknesses of Shok-buffs. He generally sells them as a combined set but if you call him he will sell you only the thin ones, which are black in color and measure about .062 thick.
I modified a standard .105 thick Shok-buff a while back by sanding it down to about .08 thick for my new Ed Brown Executive Target. Works like a charm.
I shoot 6 different .45 autos, five 5" & 1 6" longslide, all wear 1 piece or 2 piece full-length guide rods, all are Shok-buffed, & all fully sling-shot.
I do not suggest that everybody else run a FLGR.
I do not believe in cutting coils, removing material from the back of the slide dust cover, and I believe that everybody is entitled to an opinion regarding Shok-Buffs.

Gary Wells

Posts : 173
Join date : 2015-09-07

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Re: Quick question....

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