Shot plan cheat sheet

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Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by LeadSlinger on 7/23/2012, 9:08 am

Question: Does anyone have a "cheat sheet" or similar they use when shooting? If so, care to share it?

As a newbie, I'm trying to compile a short list of things to remember for each shot. As I continue to learn, experiment, and practice, I find that I'm constantly changing it. Here's my current checklist, focused on slow fire (with comments in parentheses). Any questions/comments/additions/deletions are greatly appreciated!!!

- Fit grip (the AMU way)
- Pocket left hand (sounds obvious, but for a new guy...)
- Extend arm and rest pistol on counter
- Stare down target (helps me mentally)
- Deep breath in & out
- Tighten grip
- Position trigger finger
- Deep breath in & out
- RELAX
- Raise pistol and get sight
- "Straight back" (my trigger control mantra)

I don't really have anything different for timed or rapid fire - am I missing anything? This has definitely helped my scoring. My personal best right now (50' targets) is: SF: 87, TF: 94-4X, & RF: 95-5X. However, consistency is lacking. I have yet to put 10 of 10 in the black (typically 7-9). I figure that a cheat sheet would help that.

Thanks in advance!!!

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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Larry Lang on 7/23/2012, 9:27 am

Hello Leadslinger. I can find only one concern with what you have. Keep you finger off the trigger until the pistol is raised to the shooting position. Many range officers will call you on that point and benches have been shot (don't ask me how I know Crying or Very sad)

In the heat of competition simple things can be overlooked. Start your shot plan with a packing plan to assure everything you'll need for a match will be in your box. What you do during prep time can also be documented, as should your loading procedure.

Eventually all these things will become second nature and then you get old and need to refer back to your plans.

Enjoy and be safe.
Larry (WA)
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by rob5r on 7/23/2012, 11:38 am

Might want to try putting your off hand thumb in the top of you pants/belt across your chest. Many people prefer it to the pocket because it keeps that arm tight to your body. It's not for everyone, but I like it.

Rob
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by BE Mike on 7/23/2012, 3:16 pm

Maybe I'm weird, but part of my shot plan is building a position from the ground up. I start with foot placement. Foot placement changes as the match progresses.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Rob Kovach on 7/23/2012, 8:19 pm

I leave my finger in the trigger well for all 5 shots. I've never had a range officer say anything--even at perry.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Paper-Puncher on 7/23/2012, 9:42 pm

I agree with Rob5r.....I put my thumb in behind my belt , between my belt buckle and my right front pocket..this way my arm agaisnt my body and cant move and you may have forgotten something...Keep in mind that I speak for myself ....But I get my body into position so when I raise the gun either the dot or the sights fall into the bull ..if when I raise the gun and that doesnt happen I adjust my rear foot till I'm "naturally " pointed at the target......just my .02....Keith

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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by LeadSlinger on 7/24/2012, 8:36 am

Thanks everyone!

Trigger finger placement: Point taken. Better safe than sorry.

Stance: Since I've been training mostly indoors, I really haven't thought about it. I don't have to worry about rocks/dips/bumps/etc. on the ground.

Non-shooting hand placement: I'll give the "thumb-hook" method a try.

... I'm finding that trigger control is my current enemy. Anything I should put on my list to help that? I'm sure practice is the #1 thing, but tips would be appreciated.

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Shot Plan Cheat Sheet

Post by HUGHT on 7/24/2012, 10:34 am

Trigger control is the greatest challenge for all pistol shooters. I have found a real important issue is the placement of the finger on the trigger. If the trigger is at the tip or on the first joint pad you will have problems with trigger control. you need the trigger to fit just out from the first joint where you have very little meat on the trigger. I have short fingers and have to use a short trigger to get a proper grip and trigger finger placement.

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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Larry Lang on 7/24/2012, 11:42 am

Stance, hold control, breath control, sight alignment/picture and trigger control. Focus to have it all come together as the shot breaks.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by BE Mike on 7/25/2012, 9:57 am

LeadSlinger wrote:Thanks everyone!

Trigger finger placement: Point taken. Better safe than sorry.

Stance: Since I've been training mostly indoors, I really haven't thought about it. I don't have to worry about rocks/dips/bumps/etc. on the ground.

Non-shooting hand placement: I'll give the "thumb-hook" method a try.

... I'm finding that trigger control is my current enemy. Anything I should put on my list to help that? I'm sure practice is the #1 thing, but tips would be appreciated.
Read Bill Blankenship's article about trigger control in Gil Hebard's "The Pistol Shooter's Treasury". He spent a lot of time working on good trigger control. He even invented a trigger pull gauge he had mounted on a 1911.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Founder on 7/25/2012, 4:32 pm

Part of my shot process if confirming grip. And that grip consists of pressure on the trigger.

Trigger control trumps everything else. Dry firing is the answer to learning trigger control of your firearms.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Chris_D on 7/26/2012, 6:24 am

While I believe the shot process is critical, I do not believe it offers the biggest bang for the effort. It will help with your original concern of being consistent, however, do not expect that having a consistent shot process will greatly improve your scores.

Don't get caught up in too many personal details such as where to place your free hand or how to stand, odds are really good you won't gain any points unless you are doing something drastically wrong.

I believe that the three most important aspects of a "good shot" are:
1) Sight picture / sight alignment / area of hold - combined as aiming the gun
2) Mental focus - fighting off what you think you should do and replacing it with what you have to do
3) Trigger control - without perfect trigger control, don't expect to keep the holes in the black

Nearly everything else we do in shooting or preparing for the shot contributes little to big improvements. That is not to say you shouldn't develop a shot process or shouldn't develop all the other techniques (weak hand placement, stance, etc.), all of these are important, but big point gains are not there.

As Joe mentioned, dry fire (or lots of live fire) will develop and refine the core fundamentals which are key to shooting higher scores and consistency.

Chris D




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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by BE Mike on 7/26/2012, 8:40 am

Chris_D wrote:While I believe the shot process is critical, I do not believe it offers the biggest bang for the effort. It will help with your original concern of being consistent, however, do not expect that having a consistent shot process will greatly improve your scores.

Don't get caught up in too many personal details such as where to place your free hand or how to stand, odds are really good you won't gain any points unless you are doing something drastically wrong.

I believe that the three most important aspects of a "good shot" are:
1) Sight picture / sight alignment / area of hold - combined as aiming the gun
2) Mental focus - fighting off what you think you should do and replacing it with what you have to do
3) Trigger control - without perfect trigger control, don't expect to keep the holes in the black

Nearly everything else we do in shooting or preparing for the shot contributes little to big improvements. That is not to say you shouldn't develop a shot process or shouldn't develop all the other techniques (weak hand placement, stance, etc.), all of these are important, but big point gains are not there.

As Joe mentioned, dry fire (or lots of live fire) will develop and refine the core fundamentals which are key to shooting higher scores and consistency.

Chris D



Actually the shot plan aids in your number 2 (no pun intended). It fills your mind with positive information about the shot process. At the beginning of the learning process, the shot plan can help a shooter develop good habits that translate into good scores. As one develops, the written shot plan becomes smaller and may eventually result in just "sight alignment" and "trigger control". I have found that sometimes one lapses and starts eliminating an important element in the original shot plan. Keeping the comprehensive shot plan is a good review, even after one is at a high level. If you watch the top shooters, each does everything the same each time before a shot or shot string. They probably don't do the same things, but each has his or her routine. Consistency is a key to high scores on the line. Quality preparation (training) helps one obtain that consistency. A shooting diary is also a valuable tool, if used. Little notes regarding things learned at the shooting session can help at the next training session. The notations may even end up in the written shot plan.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by LeadSlinger on 7/26/2012, 9:21 am

Thanks again, everyone!

I completely agree with the 3 points Chris D. pointed out. Specifically...

1) I'm getting pretty good here. I can usually keep the wobble area mostly in
the black. There's definitely room for improvement, and I think it
comes back to stance, grip, arm position, locked wrist, etc. That is
what I'm trying to note in my cheat sheet in the beginning of the shot
process. You all have made some good points here, so I'm trying to
incorporate all of it.
2) I concur with BE Mike that the shot plan cheat sheet will helpin the mental aspects. From watching other top shooters (mostly on Youtube), they seem
robotic in nature. They go through their steps, raise the pistol, and
center-punch the target. I'm just trying to build those robotic steps
as well as trying to keep the mental focus of a robot (to keep the stray
thoughts out of my head). I also think I need to re-review the "Zen and the Art of Shooting" articles.
3) Trigger control is my biggest hurdle right now. Many times I have
the sight perfect in the black, and then when I pull the trigger I see
it fly out and drill a 5 ring. It's not every time (right now I average 8 out of 10 and have never gone 10 for 10... yet!). I use a substantial part of my practice
time experimenting with the different techniques I've learned from the AMU manual, you
all, and the great websites that you've recommended. I only have a rimfire pistol right now, so dry firing isn't too easy (although it's a bit easier now that I found dry wall anchors work great as dummy rounds!). Right now, I'm getting to the range 1-2 times a week, so it isn't too bad. Also, 22 ammo is a really good fit for my budget!

That is an interesting note about a shooting diary. I meant to bring it up in a different topic post, but how many of you use them? If so, why? If not, why not? I see that Bullseye Gear sells nicely bound versions (that are currently out of stock), but do you use those or your own personal version? Is there a template out there that I could use?

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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by BE Mike on 7/26/2012, 9:35 am

Trigger control can become "automatic". When you get to that point, your scores will show it.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by SteveT on 7/26/2012, 1:47 pm

A shot plan is not cheating.

Anything that is important to YOU delivering a good shot should be on the plan.

This version is a little outdated; my actual copy has some scribbles and hand corrections. The words in all caps are the mantra I say to myself. The lines under each are the steps that are triggered by the word. The formatting did not copy over from word very well. It is more clear (to me) in my original. My actual shot process is 4 pages long and includes finding my stance, alignment, grip etc. This is only the actual lift / aim / shoot part, which is the most critical.

Shot Process
1. Starting with the gun loaded arm straight, resting on bench
2. HEAD
a. I am focused on this shot/string, let all other thoughts go
b. Visualize a gray cloud all around except to the target
c. Exhale visualizing the dot settling on the bull and the gun goes off or the sights in perfect alignment below the bull and the gun goes off.
3. HEART
a. I am excited about shooting this shot/string well
b. I am determined to make this the best shot/string I can deliver today
c. I am focused only on this shot/string
4. STAGE
a. Raise gun a few inches off the bench
b. There is slightly more weight on the balls of my feet and slightly more weight on my front foot
c. Slight tension in left arm pulling on belt loop holding arm against body
d. Butt is tucked under
e. Chest is full, stand up straight and tall
f. Shoulders are down
g. Arm is straight, pressure holding elbow joint open
h. Wrist is straight and very firm
i. Grip pressure is very firm, finger tips down, thumb against side
j. Trigger finger crease is on right edge of trigger, tip wrapped around
5. SLACK
a. Take up slack on trigger
b. Feel the side of the trigger with the tip
c. Read the target number then focus on the black bull
d. Raise gun to meet my eye in UL of target
e. I am determined to make this the best shot I can
6. CENTER
a. Shift focus to the dot which is centered in the tube
b. Dot is floating UL of bull
c. Focus on the center of the black
d. I am confident in my process, this will be a great shot
7. CENTER
a. Dot settles into the middle of the bull
b. Trigger pressure builds as the dot moves toward the center
c. The dot moves with the trigger into the center
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by LeadSlinger on 7/27/2012, 8:52 am

Thanks for sharing, Steve! I'm a long way from 4 pages, but, as my experience grows in the sport, I'm sure I'll get there. Every time I take my sheet to the range, I always add/subtract/alter the points written, so there's a ton of scribbles on mine as well. I'm adding some of your notes to mine, and I'm headed to the range tonight. I'm sure it will help!

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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by EdStevens on 7/27/2012, 9:55 am

Note how much of Steve's shot plan is devoted to mental preparation. IMO, physical preparation is important (stance, grip, etc.) but becomes a routine relatively easily and is soon second nature. And your subconscious mind can adjust to compensate for slight changes in stance and so on without too much difficulty. If you break the shot without being mentally prepared, however, you can virtually be guaranteed a poor result. My group size decreased most dramatically when I taught myself to first pay attention to and then control my emotional state during that second or so when the shot breaks. If you anticipate the shot in some way, expect a little "micro-twitch" that will create a flyer. It's a very subtle but (for most of us) very real effect.

Be calm, in control, and confident when pressing the trigger.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by jakuda on 7/27/2012, 6:16 pm

I'll add/emphasize something from my own shot plan.
I use the phrase "Process is primary" that I borrowed from Bassham's (Olympic gold rifle shooter) mental training book. When I need to reset, or if I ever put down the gun on an aborted shot, I tell myself "process is primary". This helps me forget about negative results, negative thoughts, and thoughts that are focused purely on the numerical score. I focus on what I can directly control.

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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by Jack H on 7/28/2012, 2:30 am

Here is a collection from several years ago...

It
seems that a common ingredient in shooting wisdom is the shot plan.
That is something to be consciously followed for each shot. It is
probably the same for everyone is general, but completely individual
in detail. A dilemma arises in my mind when I also apply the wisdom
of performing a shot on "cruise control". I am wondering
where is the separation of shooting according to your shot plan and
being on cruise? Can you apply your concentration onto determination,
which is not a physical act? Preparation, concentration,
determination. Is this a shot process? Jack





Jack
The separation happens when the shot plan becomes the mental program
that all of us use to get the shot to go off while in the zone or in
cruise control. Your particular mental program gets wired by
repetition and the mind plays it and the body does it. I have found
that a short visualization just before I lift starts the mental
program and reminds me of what I want to accomplish. Jan Brundin





I
think a good and consistent shot plan "triggers" the
subconscious carry out a good shot or string. It readies us and
prevents distractions. Dave Salyer





For
what its worth...Every time I broke 890 (many years ago), the "zone"
I entered could best be described as.. "Controlling the sights
/dot with the trigger". In other words I could move the dot to
the center with the trigger. I believe that I probably was not truly
doing this, but had melded trigger and sight at a subconscious level.
I had shot numerous high 880's via sight alignment and "let it
go off" but the top scores always exhibited that combination .
In my discussions with shooters better than me, some said they had
experienced the same phenomena, some didn't. How to get there is
another post. Regards, Larry Jachrimo





It
is a very strange phenomenon. When I heard of this technique, which I
got second hand from Don Nygord via Bill Vargo, it was referred to as
"Steer the gun with the trigger finger" I first tried it in
an Air pistol Silhouette match, using a 5 shot air pistol, and
cleaned five targets in a row at a quick rapid fire cadence. I did
not aim, I just moved the dot down onto the row of targets and they
just seemed to fall over by themselves ! Have not been able to
reproduce it since. I started to try and "pick" the point
of release, which is of course the exact opposite of what this
technique is supposed to do. When you have right, when you are "in
the zone" it is pure magic.












The
shot plan for me is the device that "sets" the cruise
control. I also agree that going through the shot plan will ensure
that you are set up consistently, (as some others have posted). The
hard part for me is getting to that mental place where the mind is
open enough to not be critical, yet focused enough to be on your
game. The shot plan is the trigger mechanism for me to wash all the
peripheral thoughts out of the conscious thought, and shoot the ten.
Just some thoughts from a novice. Oh yeah...it seems to me that BOTH
concentration and determination are MENTAL processes, not physical
acts. Just be carefull to concentrate on the shot, not the outcome.
You can be determined to shoot the X, but don't be determined to
score a 100 - 10X Brad Lightner





I
agree with Cecil. Bill Blankenship, in that long excellent article in
Pistol Shooter's Treasury, espoused the virtues of developing an
"automatic" trigger pull and keeping conscious focus on
sight alignment. And if I could develop that automatic trigger pull
I'd be happy. However, like Cecil I often find it works better to be
concentrating on trigger. A few years ago there was an article by
Brian Enos, formerly one of the top IPSC shooters on this topic. He
was noting that for him it worked better to concentrate on the
trigger. In either case, the shooter had better confine himself to
only one key thought while firing, I think. When I try to get really
zen-like and not think about anything at all, I tend to forget to
pull the trigger, a real bummer in RF.Randy Pafford











Snip:
"Controlling the sights with the trigger" I heard Brian
Zins use this phrase at a recent clinic. I didn't quite get it then,
and I don't quite get it now. Can you expand on this? Is it the
PERCEPTION that the dot moves to the center of the bull as you press
the trigger, or is something physical actually happening? I have
experienced the phenomenon, mentioned by other posters as well, that
when things are going great a shot will print as a 10 regardless of
where the dot seemed to be when the gun went off. (My problem is that
I can't maintain this state for more than a few shots at a time.) Is
this a manifestation of "controlling the sights with the
trigger?" Barry Cohen





Barry,
It means that you don't change your grip pressure as you press the
trigger. Something most shooters do. The more you shoot or dryfire
the better muscle memory and strength you develop. Desire and
concentration gets you to the top of your abilities. If you attach a
laser sight to your pistol you will see how valuable a consistent
grip is. The cheapest is to buy one of those laser pointers, wrap
some tape around it until it fits in your .45 barrel. Then go to the
range and test. Ever get one of those shots that goes off in the 8
ring but after you scope it, it's a nipper 10? You did things
correctly on that shot! Sincerely, Scott





Brad
- You bring up an excellent point. When I am shooting iron sights I
absolutely do actively concentrate on sight alignment. However, when
I am shooting a dot, I trust my subconscious mind to create the
proper "sight picture" for me. I know I want the dot
centered in the black (and so does my subconscious) but if I
concentrate on putting it there and trying to keep it there I tend to
try and "snatch" tens with my trigger and that is something
I have yet to be successful with. We have all heard, and most agree,
that we should focus on our front sight when shooting iron sights.
When shooting a dot, I like to focus on the dot itself. Many people
will say they do the same, but I doubt if they really do. Next time
you bring your gun up to the target in practice, ask yourself this
question about what you see - is the dot moving around the black or
is the black moving around the dot? Whichever object appears to be
more stationary to your eye is the one you are really focusing on.
Try to really focus on the dot and see if your "mind's eye"
doesn't take care of centering it in the black for you. I know it
works for me. Tony Yetman





I
did exactly that last night. A few months ago I noticed that I had a
tendency to let my focus wane while using the dot. This was brought
to my attention more acutely recently at an air pistol clinic (iron
sights only), and since have been questioning how much concentration
should be applied on the dot. While not exactly quantitative, I have
so far concluded that I have been concentrating at some point beyond
the dot (or the perceived depth of the dot), but still short of the
target. I focus enough to keep the dot clear, but I am identifying
the black of the target more than I would if I was using iron sights.
While this has worked for me, I am training to focus on the dot
exclusively now. If my mind can center the target for me with iron
sights, why wouldn't it do the same with the dot. I plan on using
this method for at least several months until I can decide whether or
not this will work well for me. I know of other shooters that will
let their focus move to some point between the two, and it seems to
work for them as well. As far as the trigger pull vs. sight alignment
concentration goes, I had never heard of anyone espousing the virtues
of concentrating on the trigger pull. Although I do not believe that
there is only one way to do anything, I will usually concede that the
ways that are tried and true are best to learn, but can be modified
or adapted to fit one's personal needs. Besides, someone had to be
the first to try everything...I can just imagine the hoots and howls
received by the first person who tried to focus only on the front
sight when aiming. Brad
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by CrankyThunder on 7/30/2012, 7:50 pm

While I agree with the posters above me, I am concerned that you will have a good sized encylopedia taped to your shooting box and you will be more worried about reading it and then forgetting to shoot!

While this reading can be helpful in practice, I prefer to keep it simple on the competition line. Therefore I have two quotes taped to my timer that I refer to before every slow fire shot and also before each mag in timed and rapid fire.

the first one is "Relax".



The next one is what my coach taught me which combines sigh alignment along with proper trigger pull.... it says "Watch the dot, wait for Bang".





The rational for the second quote is that the MSP pistol team hooked up some SCATT trainers on their bullseye guns and then tracked what their shooters were doing. What they found was that the shooters were holding the 10 ring approximatly 90-95 percent of the time prior to the shot and that the trigger pull would pull the shot off the ten ring. Now think about that..... If you pulled the trigger perfectly and you were holding the dot on the ten ring 95% of the time, you would score 95 on every target averaged out. therefore, when you are holding the red dot on target, it is jiggling but do not overcompensate holding it perfect. let it wiggle and squeeze the trigger properly without being too concerned where its pointed. therefore, watch the dot, wait for bang!



Regards,

Cranky
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by BE Mike on 7/31/2012, 7:33 am

Most folks wouldn't consider teaching a class without a written lesson plan. Neither would most speakers consider giving a speech without written notes or in the case of politicians (one in particular comes to mind) a teleprompter. Why would one just walk up to the line and start shooting without a plan?

I think the folks who disagree with having a written shot plan and diary have never tried it for the most part. They appear to be experts. I don't intend to demean the expert rating, as it is a very high accomplishment, but the distance between expert and master is great and one must do everything right and expend much more time and energy to get there. Don't give up on the shot plan and diary. They are valuable tools as long as you use them the way they are intended.
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Re: Shot plan cheat sheet

Post by LeadSlinger on 7/31/2012, 8:15 am

I definitely see value in a shot plan, which is why I asked. Also, since I've been using my cheat (with some changes thanks to you all), I have seen improvement in my scores. I finally went 10 for 10 in the black, which is a major accomplishment for me!

When I looked at the AMU manual, their shot plan had 84 steps (not including the sub-bullets)!!! So I was really seeking a short list of the vital few. Jack H. really posted a treasury of trigger control knowledge that I need to absorb, and I couldn't agree more with the requirement to RELAX. Keep the tips coming! Seeing that over 400 people have viewed this post, it seems like a popular topic.

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