Correct trigger finger placement

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Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Larry Lang on 6/27/2011, 4:44 pm

Over the years I’ve been plagued by watching the dot race across the scope field and be rewarded by a 7 or worse. I tried this today and it helped quite a bit:

With you pistol cocked, but not loaded, begin your trigger press, keeping the dot in the aiming area. Just before the trigger breaks let off the trigger and observe if the dot moves off the target. If it doesn’t move you are pulling the trigger straight back.

If the dot moves either left or right, re-cock and move your trigger finger slightly more or less into the trigger. If the movement is less pronounced you’re going in the right direction. If it’s worse go the other way and repeat until there is no movement of the dot in either direction. Remember how this feels and check it on the line to see if you are still pulling straight back

If you can’t achieve this balance you may need a shorter trigger or possibly a trigger shoe to keep from changing your grip.

Larry (WA)
(posting to both lists)
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Larry Lang

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Re: Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Founder on 6/29/2011, 8:40 pm

This is an interesting observation Larry and I will have to look into this a bit and see what I am doing right or wrong. But not until after Perry! Not changing anything right now.


Thanks
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Re: Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Jack H on 6/30/2011, 1:42 am

Pumping the trigger is something I do even on the firing line. It is a test of pulling straight back. To me, it also is a test to be using the right muscles to pull the trigger. This leads us to a muscle memory thing.

It has been offered that the trigger should bear on the bone between the pad and the joint. This leans contrary to the old adage "too much or too little trigger finger". Finger position seems more a result of hand and grip size. Adjustable trigger length (LOP) offers some option.
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Re: Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Larry Lang on 6/30/2011, 10:32 am

Jack H wrote:Pumping the trigger is something I do even on the firing line. It is a test of pulling straight back. To me, it also is a test to be using the right muscles to pull the trigger. This leads us to a muscle memory thing.

It has been offered that the trigger should bear on the bone between the pad and the joint. This leans contrary to the old adage "too much or too little trigger finger". Finger position seems more a result of hand and grip size. Adjustable trigger length (LOP) offers some option.

The sight will move when you use your finger to steer the sight/dot into position, with an improper grip. When the trigger breaks the gripping muscles take over and the sight moves. Some shooters have said, incorrectly, that the bullet is "still in the barrel" when movement occurs. This is wrong.
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Re: Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Jack H on 6/30/2011, 11:14 am

Larry Lang wrote:
Jack H wrote:Pumping the trigger is something I do even on the firing line. It is a test of pulling straight back. To me, it also is a test to be using the right muscles to pull the trigger. This leads us to a muscle memory thing.

It has been offered that the trigger should bear on the bone between the pad and the joint. This leans contrary to the old adage "too much or too little trigger finger". Finger position seems more a result of hand and grip size. Adjustable trigger length (LOP) offers some option.

The sight will move when you use your finger to steer the sight/dot into position, with an improper grip. When the trigger breaks the gripping muscles take over and the sight moves. Some shooters have said, incorrectly, that the bullet is "still in the barrel" when movement occurs. This is wrong.

I don't think I am smart enough to tell if I steer the sight with my trigger. Actual steering sounds a bit on the unwanted conscious side of things. I really don't know what does the fine alignment of the sights and placement on target (from just off the bull). I suspect a whole hand and mental involvement that aligns, places,
triggers, and follows the shot as a flow of moves in the last 1-3
seconds. My logic tells me that if I am steering, I am more likely to _not_ steer the sight _off_ line with the trigger.
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Re: Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Rob Kovach on 7/3/2011, 12:59 am

Is it wrong to have the trigger rest on the bony part at the tip of my finger? I have my trigger finger in a sort of a C shape.
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Re: Correct trigger finger placement

Post by Larry Lang on 7/3/2011, 11:55 am

Rob Kovach wrote:Is it wrong to have the trigger rest on the bony part at the tip of my finger? I have my trigger finger in a sort of a C shape.

Years ago I was told, "Don't allow any part of your trigger finger to touch the frame or trigger guard." Your finger should be in an arc and contact the trigger somewhere between the first knuckle and the tip.

Not everyone has the same size hand or trigger finger. With a 1911, selecting a trigger length that allows you to press the trigger straight back is simple. Likewise, if you shoot a "Euro-gun", with an adjustable trigger makes the fit simple.

The only wrong way is NOT PRESSING STRAIGHT BACK.
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